Catapulting into Classical

A headlong leap into music, history, and composing


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Free Opera Webcasts: Il trovatore and the Marriage of Figaro

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

Two classic operas will be presented on OperaVision in the next week.

First, on July 6, 2019 at 21:00 CET (GMT -2; 3PM EDT) the Teatro Real in Madrid will present Verdi’s Il trovatore.

Next, on July 9, 2019 at 20:00 CET (GMT -2; 2PM EDT) the Royal Opera House in London will present Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro.

Go to the OperVision link above to view the performances.  If you will not be able to watch the operas at these times, they will be available for on-demand viewing shortly thereafter for a limited time.  Follow this link to see the operas currently available in the library.

Enjoy!

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Beethoven or Mahler?  Your Choice—Live Webcasts This Saturday

Broadcast tower topped by music note, globe in background

On Saturday, March 16, 2019 8:00 PM EDT (GMT -4), the Detroit Symphony Orchestra will present Mahler’s Symphony No. 5.  The program will also include Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5, featuring violinist Yoonshin SongRafael Payare will conduct.  You can see the DSO concert here.

Also on Saturday, March 16, 2019 8:00 PM EDT (GMT -4), the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra will present pianist Jonathan Biss performing Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3.  The program will also include Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture, and Watermark, a Concerto for Piano by Caroline Shaw, a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer. Watermark is one of five piano concertos commissioned by the SPCO and Biss to coordinate with Beethoven’s piano concertos (read more about the Beethoven/5 concerto commissioning project here).  You can read the composer’s comments on Watermark hereMischa Santora will conduct.  You can see the SPCO concert here.

Wherever your weekend takes you, I hope you will find some time to enjoy music!


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No Wrong Number: The Aria Code Opera Podcast Series and More

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

I have been reading enthusiastic reviews of Aria Code, a new series of podcasts sponsored by WQXR, the Metropolitan Opera and WNYC Studios.  And after listening, I agree.

Each podcast discusses one aria.  Just one.  Afterward, the aria is presented in its entirety without interruption.

For those looking for an introduction to opera, this is what I would call an easy on-ramp.  The presenters provide diverse views and insights into each aria, revealing details one might not have heard otherwise.  Each podcast lasts around 30 minutes.

Arias from Verdi’s La Traviata and Otello, Puccini’s La Boheme and Tosca, and Saint-Saën’s Dalila have been presented thus far.

You can listen to Aria Code at https://www.wnycstudios.org/shows/aria-code.

 

Are you in the mood for full operas now?  Here’s just some of what’s currently available on demand at OperaVision:

Mozart: The Marriage of Figaro and The Magic Flute

Verdi: Macbeth

Puccini: Tosca

Wagner: The Flying Dutchman

Britten: Albert Herring

Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor

Click here for a list of all the operas currently available.


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Want to Binge Watch Opera?  Want to Give Opera a Try for the First Time?

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

Opera fans, this post is for you!  Not an opera fan yet?  This is also for you!  The OperaVision website and the OperaVision YouTube channel have a wide variety of operas for you to enjoy (or just sample, if you’d like).   The operas are available on demand, free of charge, no login necessary.

Here’s some of what’s currently available on demand:

Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande

Handel: Semele

Humperdinck: Hänsel und Gretel

Martinu: Juliette

Mascagni and Leoncavallo: Cavalleria rusticana and I Pagliacci

Monteverdi: L’Orfeo

Mozart: Le nozze di Figaro

Offenbach: Blaubart

Poulenc: Dialogues des Carmélites

Puccini: Turandot

Verdi: Aida

Wagner: the entire Ring cycle

Here’s what’s coming up in April:

April 1   Wagner:  Parsifal

April 2   Rossini Gala: Homage to Conductor Alberto Zedda featuring a number of overtures and selections from Rossini’s operas.

April 8   Verdi: Il corsaro

April 14 Verdi: La Traviata

April 26: Donizetti: La Favorite

 

What if you’re not sold on the idea of opera?  Do you think language will be a barrier?  These operas have subtitles in a number of languages.  Don’t know how to get into opera?  Check out OperaVision’s New to Opera? tab.  Not sure if you can devote a couple hours in one sitting?  Then watching from home is perfect!  You can take a break whenever you want and come back whenever you want (just remember to write down the timestamp where you stopped).  It’s a great no-risk opportunity to sample a variety of different opera styles or find a new favorite.

If you watch something that you like, let us all know about it!


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Free Concert Webcasts: Berlioz, Elgar, New Music, and Opera!

Tomorrow, 21 October 2017 at 8:00 PM EDT (GMT -5), visit dso.org/live for a performance of Harold in Italy by Hector Berlioz, Elgar’s Cello Concerto, and the world premiere of Loren Loiacono’s Smothered by Sky (at link see page 19).

The Opera Platform website, long the home of free opera webcasts, is now Operavision.eu.  Operas typically remain available for viewing on the site for six months after their initial webcast, and some are available with subtitles in multiple languages.  Operas currently available on the new website include Puccini’s Tosca and Madama Butterfly, Handel’s Acis and Galatea, and Verdi’s La Traviata.  Haven’t watched opera before? Check out Operavision’s New To Opera? tab for some helpful information.

Also, opera fans, please note that Operavision will present Wagner’s entire Ring cycle in separate webcasts beginning 28 October 2017, and, on a lighter note, Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro on 3 November.


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Haiku Wednesday: Beyond–Bach in Interstellar Space

Poster showing the outline of the Voyager spacecraft against a blue and black painted background representing space

Beethoven, Mozart,
Bach wrote music for all time,
And now, all of space.

Bach traveled on foot
Over two hundred miles to
Hear great music, learn.

Now his music flies
Beyond the sun’s reach, into
Interstellar space.

This week NASA is celebrating the 40th anniversary of the launch of the Voyager 1 spacecraft.  When Voyager 1 and 2 were launched, each carried a golden record containing images and the sounds of Earth.  Along with greetings in over 50 human languages, whale song, and sounds of nature, there was a selection of the world’s music, including classical music.

One of the spacecraft has now left our solar system and is in interstellar space; the other will be there soon.  And as they travel through the dark and empty space between the stars, our “silent ambassadors”1 carry the story of who we are.  Here are the classical selections chosen for the record:

Bach, Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F. First Movement, performed by the Munich Bach Orchestra, Karl Richter, conductor.

Bach, “Gavotte en rondeaux” from Partita No. 3 in E major for violin, performed by Arthur Grumiaux

Bach, The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 2, Prelude and Fugue in C, No. 1, performed by Glenn Gould, piano.

Beethoven, Fifth Symphony, First Movement, performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra, Otto Klemperer, conductor.

Beethoven, String Quartet No. 13 in B flat, Opus 130, Cavatina, performed by the Budapest String Quartet (read more about the Cavatina here).

Holborne, “The Fairie Round”, performed by David Munrow and the Early Music Consort of London.

Mozart, The Magic Flute, Queen of the Night aria, No. 14, performed by Edda Moser, soprano and the Bavarian State Opera, Munich, Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor.

Stravinsky, Rite of Spring, Sacrificial Dance, performed by the Columbia Symphony Orchestra, Igor Stravinsky, conductor.

Bach walked 250 miles to hear the music of Dieterich Buxtehude and learn from him. The Voyager spacecraft are now 10-12 billion miles from Earth and are outward bound at around 40,000 miles per hour.  They’re still sending back fascinating and valuable data. Like Bach, they have traveled a long way in the pursuit of knowledge.  And the results have been glorious.

Image of Saturn, its rings, and moons taken by the Voyager spacecraft.

Image of Saturn, its rings, and two moons taken by the Voyager spacecraft. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

What music would you select to represent all of us?

References

  1.  https://www.space.com/37860-voyager-mission-40-years-ed-stone-interview.html
  2.  http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/voyager-nasa-exploring-unknown-1.4267178
  3. https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/golden-record/whats-on-the-record/music/
  4. https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/index.html
  5. https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/

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Image attribution:  Like the image? Download it (and more) for free at https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/downloads/

Image of Saturn courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/galleries/images-voyager-took/saturn/.


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Free On-Demand Viewing of 10 Operas for the European Opera Days Celebration

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

The Opera Platform will present ten operas as part of the European Opera Days celebration, May 5-14, 2017.  On-demand viewing begins at midnight CET (11PM UTC; 7PM EDT).  Here’s what you can see:

Ginestera: Bomarzo from the Teatro Real Madrid

Bizet: Carmen, two performances, from the Latvian National Opera and the Opéra de Lyon

Vivaldi: Farnace from the Opéra National du Rhin Strasbourg

Janáček: Foxie! Cunning Little Vixen from La Monnaie De Munt Brussels

Rossini: Il Turco in Italia from the Bergen National Opera

Monteverdi: L’incoronazione di Poppea from Opéra de Lille

Charpentier: Médée from Theater Basel

Thordarson (Þórðarson): Ragnheiður

Mozart: The Magic Flute (set in outer space) from Den Norske Opera Oslo

Learn more about European Opera Days and the featured operas here.

See other operas currently available on The Opera Platform here.