Catapulting into Classical

A headlong leap into music, history, and composing


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Free Concert Webcasts Alert!

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

This morning, April 13, 2018 at 10:45 AM (GMT -4) The Detroit Symphony Orchestra will offer a free live webcast (see it here) with the following program:

Debussy: Printemps
Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No 1 with violinist Ray Chen
Schumann: Symphony No 1, “Spring”
Hannu Lintu will conduct.

Tomorrow, April 14, 2018, OperaVision will present a live stream of events from Den Norske Opera in Oslo to celebrate the opera house’s 10th anniversary.  You can see it on the OperaVision YouTube channel.  Highlights of the broadcast will be an attempt at a world record (at 8:15AM ET, GMT-4) for the largest number of people singing Verdi’s aria Va Pensiero from the roof of the opera house (which can also be seen on OperaVision’s Facebook page), and a live performance of Verdi’s La Traviata at 3:00PM ET (GMT-4).


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Haiku Wednesday: Charles Gounod

Charles Gounod

Today’s a good day
To get to know Charles Gounod,
The French composer.

Ave Maria
Is the only thing most know
(and the Hitchcock theme).

But he wrote over
600 pieces; one, a
National anthem.

And so, I urge you
To get to know Charles Gounod,
The French composer.

If you ask people what they know about Charles Gounod, you’re likely to hear about his adaptation of Bach’s Prelude in C Major, the Bach-Gounod Ave Maria.

Some might mention his opera Faust (here’s a short excerpt).

Some might remember that he wrote The Funeral March of a Marionette, known to some readers of a certain age as the theme to the television show Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

Then it gets very quiet.

And yet Gounod wrote over 600 pieces, including two symphonies and the delightful Petite Symphonie for woodwinds.

Gounod wrote several masses, his best-known being the Messa Solennelle de Saint-Cecile.  Gounod’s Marche Pontificale became the national anthem of Vatican City.

A rather unusual piece (and instrument) that you need to see is Gounod’s Concerto for piano-pédalier and orchestra.  It is a grand piano equipped with pedals like an organ.  Here is the first movement.*

Want more?  For all things Charles Gounod, be sure to check out charles-gounod.com, a webpage created by Gounod’s great-great-grandson, containing photographs, letters, a discography, and more.

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*Composer Charles-Valentin Alkan wrote a number of pieces for the piano-pédalier, including a series of preludes, as well as etudes for the feet alone.  Looks like that might be another blog post!

References

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Gounod
  2. http://www.charles-gounod.com/vi/
  3. http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Gounod,_Charles

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Image attribution:  Charles Gounod by Nadar (a.k.a. Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, 1820–1910): Photographer Adam Cuerden – Restoration. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ACharles_Gounod_(1890)_by_Nadar.jpg.


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Want to Binge Watch Opera?  Want to Give Opera a Try for the First Time?

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

Opera fans, this post is for you!  Not an opera fan yet?  This is also for you!  The OperaVision website and the OperaVision YouTube channel have a wide variety of operas for you to enjoy (or just sample, if you’d like).   The operas are available on demand, free of charge, no login necessary.

Here’s some of what’s currently available on demand:

Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande

Handel: Semele

Humperdinck: Hänsel und Gretel

Martinu: Juliette

Mascagni and Leoncavallo: Cavalleria rusticana and I Pagliacci

Monteverdi: L’Orfeo

Mozart: Le nozze di Figaro

Offenbach: Blaubart

Poulenc: Dialogues des Carmélites

Puccini: Turandot

Verdi: Aida

Wagner: the entire Ring cycle

Here’s what’s coming up in April:

April 1   Wagner:  Parsifal

April 2   Rossini Gala: Homage to Conductor Alberto Zedda featuring a number of overtures and selections from Rossini’s operas.

April 8   Verdi: Il corsaro

April 14 Verdi: La Traviata

April 26: Donizetti: La Favorite

 

What if you’re not sold on the idea of opera?  Do you think language will be a barrier?  These operas have subtitles in a number of languages.  Don’t know how to get into opera?  Check out OperaVision’s New to Opera? tab.  Not sure if you can devote a couple hours in one sitting?  Then watching from home is perfect!  You can take a break whenever you want and come back whenever you want (just remember to write down the timestamp where you stopped).  It’s a great no-risk opportunity to sample a variety of different opera styles or find a new favorite.

If you watch something that you like, let us all know about it!


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Telemann Fans:  New Aria Discovered!

Georg Philipp Telemann

RISM has reported1 that a new aria from an opera by Georg Philipp Telemann has been found in Braunschweig, Germany.  The aria, “Mein Herz is viel zu schwach, Euch zu verlassen” [My heart is far too weak to leave you], is believed to be from the opera Die königliche Schäferin Margenis [The Royal Shepherdess Margenis].

The manuscript is written in German organ tablature notation, but a modern transcription has been published in the German-language music journal Concerto.2

You can read more about the discovery here.

A previously unknown set of fantasias for viola da gamba by Telemann was found in 2015Recordings of that set of fantasias have since been released.

References

  1. “Mein Herz ist viel zu schwach” – A Newly Discovered Aria by Georg Philipp Telemann. RISM.info, Feb. 19, 2018. http://www.rism.info/en/home/newsdetails/article/2/mein-herz-ist-viel-zu-schwach-a-newly-discovered-aria-by-georg-philipp-telemann.html.
  2. Lauterwasser, Helmut, “’Mein Herz ist viel zu schwach, Euch zu verlassen’ Eine neu entdeckte Arie von Georg Philipp Telemann,” [“My heart is far too weak to leave you” A Newly discovered aria by Georg Philipp Telemann], CONCERTO – Das Magazin für Alte Musik No 277 (January/February 2018), pp 22-25.

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Image attribution:  Georg Philipp Telemann (1681–1767), [Public domain] hand-colored aquatint by Valentin Daniel Preisler, after a lost painting by Louis Michael Schneider, 1750.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Telemann.jpg.


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Haiku Wednesday: Handel’s Semele

Painting of Jupiter and Semele by Luca Ferrari
“Wherever you walk
There will be trees and flowers,
For you are lovely.”

So said Jupiter
To Semele; she doubted.
You know where this goes.

Whenever humans
Get involved with the Greek gods,
It doesn’t end well.

Tonight, 25 October 2017 at 19:00 CET (GMT +1), operavision.eu and the Garsington Opera will present Handel’s Semele, the story of a mortal woman seduced by Jupiter.  Handel filled this oratorio with wonderful arias.  However, the audience at the premiere was shocked, as Handel presented this sensual story during the solemn Lenten season.

No previews from tonight’s performance are available, but I really wanted you to hear a sample from Semele, so here is a performance of “Where’er you walk” by John Mark Ainsley.

Semele will be available for a few months after the initial webcast.

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Image attribution: Jupiter and Semele by Luca Ferrari [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Luca_Ferrari_-_Jupiter_and_Semele.jpg


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Free Concert Webcasts: Berlioz, Elgar, New Music, and Opera!

Tomorrow, 21 October 2017 at 8:00 PM EDT (GMT -5), visit dso.org/live for a performance of Harold in Italy by Hector Berlioz, Elgar’s Cello Concerto, and the world premiere of Loren Loiacono’s Smothered by Sky (at link see page 19).

The Opera Platform website, long the home of free opera webcasts, is now Operavision.eu.  Operas typically remain available for viewing on the site for six months after their initial webcast, and some are available with subtitles in multiple languages.  Operas currently available on the new website include Puccini’s Tosca and Madama Butterfly, Handel’s Acis and Galatea, and Verdi’s La Traviata.  Haven’t watched opera before? Check out Operavision’s New To Opera? tab for some helpful information.

Also, opera fans, please note that Operavision will present Wagner’s entire Ring cycle in separate webcasts beginning 28 October 2017, and, on a lighter note, Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro on 3 November.


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Free On-Demand Viewing of 10 Operas for the European Opera Days Celebration

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

The Opera Platform will present ten operas as part of the European Opera Days celebration, May 5-14, 2017.  On-demand viewing begins at midnight CET (11PM UTC; 7PM EDT).  Here’s what you can see:

Ginestera: Bomarzo from the Teatro Real Madrid

Bizet: Carmen, two performances, from the Latvian National Opera and the Opéra de Lyon

Vivaldi: Farnace from the Opéra National du Rhin Strasbourg

Janáček: Foxie! Cunning Little Vixen from La Monnaie De Munt Brussels

Rossini: Il Turco in Italia from the Bergen National Opera

Monteverdi: L’incoronazione di Poppea from Opéra de Lille

Charpentier: Médée from Theater Basel

Thordarson (Þórðarson): Ragnheiður

Mozart: The Magic Flute (set in outer space) from Den Norske Opera Oslo

Learn more about European Opera Days and the featured operas here.

See other operas currently available on The Opera Platform here.


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Two Free Opera Live Webcasts This Weekend

stick guy singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antenna

This weekend, April 1 and 2, 2017,  The Opera Platform presents two live webcasts.

Today, April 1, 2017 at 12:55 EDT (GMT -4) The Opera Platform will present Lucrezia Borgia by Gaetano Donizetti  from the stage of the Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia in Valencia Spain.

Tomorrow, April 2, 2017 at 12:55 EDT (GMT -4) see the opening performance of Sorochintsy Fair by Modest Mussorgsky and Vissarion Shebalin (who finished the incomplete opera) from the stage of the Komische Oper in Berlin.

If you can’t make it, you will be able to view the webcast for a limited time on the website.  Check out the website for other operas available for viewing on demand.


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Free Webcast: Wagner’s Entire Ring Cycle

stick figure singing opera on a television with a viking helmet for an antennaGot plans for the weekend?  I have a suggestion:  binge watch a tale of greed, forbidden love, death, revenge, and apocalypse.  And the soundtrack is incredible!

BBC Arts and The Space are presenting for free online viewing performances of the operas in Wagner’s Ring cycle produced by Opera NorthHere’s the trailer.

It is available worldwide at this link. There are English subtitles.  Each of the four operas is presented separately, in case you don’t have a spare 15 hours straight to watch the entire cycle.  Here’s where you can find out more about each of the four operas in the cycle and the performers.  Here is the trailer for Siegfried.

In the reference section, you can find some fine websites that provide an introduction to the Ring before you embark on this epic journey.   Here is the Southbank Centre’s animated guide to the Ring.  And I particularly like this 2 1/2-minute video in which the Sydney Symphony Orchestra tells the story of the Ring.

I hope you will enjoy the Ring!

 

Postscript–because someone is bound to ask.  For those of you (in particular, Americans of a certain age) who can’t hear Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries without thinking “Kill the wabbit,” here’s a link to the Bugs Bunny cartoon “What’s Opera, Doc?”  In addition to using Ride of the Valkyries, the cartoon borrows from Wagner’s opera TannhäuserYou can read about it here.

References

Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Ring_des_Nibelungen

“Wagner’s Ring Cycle: Where to Start” http://www.classicfm.com/composers/wagner/guides/wagner-ring-cycle-where-start/

This website from the University of Michigan will help you learn more about the symbolism used in the Ring cycle http://www.umich.edu/~umfandsf/symbolismproject/symbolism.html/Teutonic_Mythology/ringsum.html

Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s guide to the Ring https://youtu.be/AgzZ_nLOJJE

Southbank Centre’s animated guide to the Ring https://youtu.be/ykQ7jc09OAk

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Image attribution: Stick figure singing opera on a television with a viking helmet as an antenna, C. Gallant, 2016.


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Mozart Mania: Over 8 Hours of Free Webcasts Now Available!

Mozart

More Mozart than you can shake a baton at!

More Mozart than you can Handel!

Ok, I’ll stop now.

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra has made all six programs of its MozartFest concert series available on YouTube until March 3, 2017.  That’s over eight hours of music available for your viewing and listening enjoyment.  Here’s the link for the “Mo-Fest BingeFest playlist.”

Here’s what you can see.

Overtures!

to Cosi fan Tutte

to Don Giovanni

to La Clemenza di Tito

to The Marriage of Figaro

to The Magic Flute

to The Abduction from the Seraglio

Concertos!

Bassoon Concerto

Flute Concerto

Concerto for Flute and Harp (exquisite!)

Horn Concertos 1, 2, 3, and 4

Oboe Concerto

Symphonies!

No 35, “Haffner”

No 36, “Linz”

No. 38, “Prague”

No. 39

No. 40

No. 41, “Jupiter”

But wait, there’s more!

Eine kleine Nachtmusik

Concertone

Sinfonia Concertante

You can also see works by Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Mahler, Bruckner, Schumann, Tchaikovsky and more on the Detroit Symphony Orchestra channel.  Click the Videos tab to see what’s available.